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Actresses Cite Pay Discrimination in the Nepali Film Industry
Nepali actresses say that despite a constitutional provision that ensures pay equality for men and women, they earn less than actors. Industry insiders confirm this, but disagree on the reasons and remedies.
KATHMANDU, NEPAL – Basundhara Bhusal, 55, says she is the oldest living actress in the Nepali film industry. She has acted in 135 feature films and 60 television series.

But despite her prolific career, she says she hardly earns enough to buy a new sari.

“Five years ago, the famous movie director Prakash Thapa scolded me for wearing the same clothes in many movies,” she says. “But what did he know? I had to wear the same clothes in a bunch of movies because I didn’t have money to buy a new wardrobe for every movie.”

Bhusal says male actors have long been paid more than their female counterparts in the movie industry here.

“The situation was the same decades ago as well,” says Bhusal, who had a role in one of Nepal’s first feature films called “Aama.”

Despite a new provision in Nepal’s constitution that is supposed to ensure men and women are paid equally for the same work, Bhusal and other local actresses say gender discrimination when it comes to salaries in the film industry remains common.

“Even today, female actors are paid almost 50 percent less than male actors,” she says.

Bhusal says she has been advocating for equal pay among actors since long before the constitutional provision came to be.

Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/actresses-cite-pay-discrimination-nepali-film-industry#ixzz1SBfzBB00

Actresses Cite Pay Discrimination in the Nepali Film Industry

Nepali actresses say that despite a constitutional provision that ensures pay equality for men and women, they earn less than actors. Industry insiders confirm this, but disagree on the reasons and remedies.

KATHMANDU, NEPAL – Basundhara Bhusal, 55, says she is the oldest living actress in the Nepali film industry. She has acted in 135 feature films and 60 television series.

But despite her prolific career, she says she hardly earns enough to buy a new sari.

“Five years ago, the famous movie director Prakash Thapa scolded me for wearing the same clothes in many movies,” she says. “But what did he know? I had to wear the same clothes in a bunch of movies because I didn’t have money to buy a new wardrobe for every movie.”

Bhusal says male actors have long been paid more than their female counterparts in the movie industry here.

“The situation was the same decades ago as well,” says Bhusal, who had a role in one of Nepal’s first feature films called “Aama.”

Despite a new provision in Nepal’s constitution that is supposed to ensure men and women are paid equally for the same work, Bhusal and other local actresses say gender discrimination when it comes to salaries in the film industry remains common.

“Even today, female actors are paid almost 50 percent less than male actors,” she says.

Bhusal says she has been advocating for equal pay among actors since long before the constitutional provision came to be.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/actresses-cite-pay-discrimination-nepali-film-industry#ixzz1SBfzBB00

Filed under Discrimination Gender Justice Arts and Culture Nepal

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