Changing The World Through Journalism

Global Press Institute

Posts tagged Arts and Culture

1 note

Ugandans Clash on Polygamy as Parliament Debates Ban
As Parliament debates a bill that would ban polygamy, Ugandans express mixed views about growing up in polygamous families, though 28 percent of married women in Uganda are currently in polygamous unions. Some say the practice is natural, while others say it harms children and violates women’s rights. 
KAMPALA, UGANDA – Tom Kasekende, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, says he grew up in a polygamous home in which his father had several wives.

“I grew up in a polygamous family,” he says. “My father had many wives, some of them I did not even know. I would just hear about them as a child.”

He says that his family was Protestant but that his father’s many wives would often engage in witchcraft in order to compete for their husband’s attention.

“They were always bewitching each other to get my father’s attention,” he says.

Kasekende says that as he grew up, he decided that polygamy wasn’t a the way of life he would choose. “Children in a polygamous marriage are not loved by their parents, especially the father, who is always moving from one family to another,” he says. “As a man, the women are always bewitching you and you even get confused.”

He says that polygamy may have thrived in traditional societies, when the cost of living was relatively low. But he says that the high cost of living and rising inflation here make large families less sustainable. He says that today, having multiple wives, all with their own children, breeds greed, selfishness and poverty in homes.
Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/uganda/ugandans-clash-polygamy-parliament-debates-ban#ixzz1Sj8lSHS6

Ugandans Clash on Polygamy as Parliament Debates Ban

As Parliament debates a bill that would ban polygamy, Ugandans express mixed views about growing up in polygamous families, though 28 percent of married women in Uganda are currently in polygamous unions. Some say the practice is natural, while others say it harms children and violates women’s rights.

KAMPALA, UGANDA – Tom Kasekende, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, says he grew up in a polygamous home in which his father had several wives.


“I grew up in a polygamous family,” he says. “My father had many wives, some of them I did not even know. I would just hear about them as a child.”


He says that his family was Protestant but that his father’s many wives would often engage in witchcraft in order to compete for their husband’s attention.


“They were always bewitching each other to get my father’s attention,” he says.


Kasekende says that as he grew up, he decided that polygamy wasn’t a the way of life he would choose. “Children in a polygamous marriage are not loved by their parents, especially the father, who is always moving from one family to another,” he says. “As a man, the women are always bewitching you and you even get confused.”


He says that polygamy may have thrived in traditional societies, when the cost of living was relatively low. But he says that the high cost of living and rising inflation here make large families less sustainable. He says that today, having multiple wives, all with their own children, breeds greed, selfishness and poverty in homes.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/uganda/ugandans-clash-polygamy-parliament-debates-ban#ixzz1Sj8lSHS6

Filed under Arts and Culture Community Law and Society Social

1 note

Actresses Cite Pay Discrimination in the Nepali Film Industry
Nepali actresses say that despite a constitutional provision that ensures pay equality for men and women, they earn less than actors. Industry insiders confirm this, but disagree on the reasons and remedies.
KATHMANDU, NEPAL – Basundhara Bhusal, 55, says she is the oldest living actress in the Nepali film industry. She has acted in 135 feature films and 60 television series.

But despite her prolific career, she says she hardly earns enough to buy a new sari.

“Five years ago, the famous movie director Prakash Thapa scolded me for wearing the same clothes in many movies,” she says. “But what did he know? I had to wear the same clothes in a bunch of movies because I didn’t have money to buy a new wardrobe for every movie.”

Bhusal says male actors have long been paid more than their female counterparts in the movie industry here.

“The situation was the same decades ago as well,” says Bhusal, who had a role in one of Nepal’s first feature films called “Aama.”

Despite a new provision in Nepal’s constitution that is supposed to ensure men and women are paid equally for the same work, Bhusal and other local actresses say gender discrimination when it comes to salaries in the film industry remains common.

“Even today, female actors are paid almost 50 percent less than male actors,” she says.

Bhusal says she has been advocating for equal pay among actors since long before the constitutional provision came to be.

Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/actresses-cite-pay-discrimination-nepali-film-industry#ixzz1SBfzBB00

Actresses Cite Pay Discrimination in the Nepali Film Industry

Nepali actresses say that despite a constitutional provision that ensures pay equality for men and women, they earn less than actors. Industry insiders confirm this, but disagree on the reasons and remedies.

KATHMANDU, NEPAL – Basundhara Bhusal, 55, says she is the oldest living actress in the Nepali film industry. She has acted in 135 feature films and 60 television series.

But despite her prolific career, she says she hardly earns enough to buy a new sari.

“Five years ago, the famous movie director Prakash Thapa scolded me for wearing the same clothes in many movies,” she says. “But what did he know? I had to wear the same clothes in a bunch of movies because I didn’t have money to buy a new wardrobe for every movie.”

Bhusal says male actors have long been paid more than their female counterparts in the movie industry here.

“The situation was the same decades ago as well,” says Bhusal, who had a role in one of Nepal’s first feature films called “Aama.”

Despite a new provision in Nepal’s constitution that is supposed to ensure men and women are paid equally for the same work, Bhusal and other local actresses say gender discrimination when it comes to salaries in the film industry remains common.

“Even today, female actors are paid almost 50 percent less than male actors,” she says.

Bhusal says she has been advocating for equal pay among actors since long before the constitutional provision came to be.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/actresses-cite-pay-discrimination-nepali-film-industry#ixzz1SBfzBB00

Filed under Discrimination Gender Justice Arts and Culture Nepal