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Ugandans Clash on Polygamy as Parliament Debates Ban
As Parliament debates a bill that would ban polygamy, Ugandans express mixed views about growing up in polygamous families, though 28 percent of married women in Uganda are currently in polygamous unions. Some say the practice is natural, while others say it harms children and violates women’s rights. 
KAMPALA, UGANDA – Tom Kasekende, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, says he grew up in a polygamous home in which his father had several wives.

“I grew up in a polygamous family,” he says. “My father had many wives, some of them I did not even know. I would just hear about them as a child.”

He says that his family was Protestant but that his father’s many wives would often engage in witchcraft in order to compete for their husband’s attention.

“They were always bewitching each other to get my father’s attention,” he says.

Kasekende says that as he grew up, he decided that polygamy wasn’t a the way of life he would choose. “Children in a polygamous marriage are not loved by their parents, especially the father, who is always moving from one family to another,” he says. “As a man, the women are always bewitching you and you even get confused.”

He says that polygamy may have thrived in traditional societies, when the cost of living was relatively low. But he says that the high cost of living and rising inflation here make large families less sustainable. He says that today, having multiple wives, all with their own children, breeds greed, selfishness and poverty in homes.
Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/uganda/ugandans-clash-polygamy-parliament-debates-ban#ixzz1Sj8lSHS6

Ugandans Clash on Polygamy as Parliament Debates Ban

As Parliament debates a bill that would ban polygamy, Ugandans express mixed views about growing up in polygamous families, though 28 percent of married women in Uganda are currently in polygamous unions. Some say the practice is natural, while others say it harms children and violates women’s rights.

KAMPALA, UGANDA – Tom Kasekende, whose name has been changed to protect his identity, says he grew up in a polygamous home in which his father had several wives.


“I grew up in a polygamous family,” he says. “My father had many wives, some of them I did not even know. I would just hear about them as a child.”


He says that his family was Protestant but that his father’s many wives would often engage in witchcraft in order to compete for their husband’s attention.


“They were always bewitching each other to get my father’s attention,” he says.


Kasekende says that as he grew up, he decided that polygamy wasn’t a the way of life he would choose. “Children in a polygamous marriage are not loved by their parents, especially the father, who is always moving from one family to another,” he says. “As a man, the women are always bewitching you and you even get confused.”


He says that polygamy may have thrived in traditional societies, when the cost of living was relatively low. But he says that the high cost of living and rising inflation here make large families less sustainable. He says that today, having multiple wives, all with their own children, breeds greed, selfishness and poverty in homes.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/uganda/ugandans-clash-polygamy-parliament-debates-ban#ixzz1Sj8lSHS6

Filed under Arts and Culture Community Law and Society Social

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Lack of Garbage Disposal Poses Environmental, Health Risks in Kashmir
Heaps of trash line streets and streams in Srinagar, Kashmir’s summer capital. Pests and health risks are on the rise while recycling programs and landfill maintenance remain weak.

SRINAGAR, KASHMIR, INDIA – Garbage disposal has long been inefficient in Kashmir. Local people who throw the trash from their homes out on the streets remain the biggest culprits contributing to increased pests and health risks here. While municipality workers strive to collect street garbage and take it to dumping sites, landfills here remain poorly maintained.

Besides being an unpleasant sight, heaps of trash along roadsides, in streams, and even near schools and government buildings pose significant health risks. Trash piles have become breeding grounds for disease vectors, such as flies, mosquitoes, cockroaches, rats and other pests. Animal advocates say street trash is also contributing to the rise in stray dogs on the streets of Srinagar.

Environmental advocates have also begun to stress the need for segregation in processing the waste. Both biodegradable and nonbiodegradable materials end up in landfills, as recycling of paper, bottles and cans remains rare.
View slideshow: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/india/lack-garbage-disposal-poses-environmental-health-risks-kashmir#ixzz1S5TfpPZW

Lack of Garbage Disposal Poses Environmental, Health Risks in Kashmir

Heaps of trash line streets and streams in Srinagar, Kashmir’s summer capital. Pests and health risks are on the rise while recycling programs and landfill maintenance remain weak.

SRINAGAR, KASHMIR, INDIA – Garbage disposal has long been inefficient in Kashmir. Local people who throw the trash from their homes out on the streets remain the biggest culprits contributing to increased pests and health risks here. While municipality workers strive to collect street garbage and take it to dumping sites, landfills here remain poorly maintained.

Besides being an unpleasant sight, heaps of trash along roadsides, in streams, and even near schools and government buildings pose significant health risks. Trash piles have become breeding grounds for disease vectors, such as flies, mosquitoes, cockroaches, rats and other pests. Animal advocates say street trash is also contributing to the rise in stray dogs on the streets of Srinagar.

Environmental advocates have also begun to stress the need for segregation in processing the waste. Both biodegradable and nonbiodegradable materials end up in landfills, as recycling of paper, bottles and cans remains rare.



View slideshow: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/india/lack-garbage-disposal-poses-environmental-health-risks-kashmir#ixzz1S5TfpPZW

Filed under Community Recycling Health Trash Disposal India

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Socio-economic Factors Push Women, Girls in Cameroon to Seek Backstreet Abortions
High risks associated with unsafe abortions in Cameroon don’t deter women and girls here. Economic, social, legal and religious pressures – combined with a lack of information about and access to reproductive health services – often override fear of health risks.

BAMENDA, CAMEROON – Lina, 27, says that when she was 23, her friend told her that she was pregnant. The friend’s boyfriend deserted her when she told him.

Lina, who declined to give her full name for privacy reasons, proposed that they talk to her friend’s mother, but her friend said this wasn’t an option because her mother was Christian and would throw her out of the house for getting pregnant before marriage. Lina says they decided their only option was for her friend to get an abortion out of town where no one would recognize them and no official records would be kept.

She says that they consulted their peers on where they could get a quick and cheap abortion and were referred to a “doctor.” But Lina says that when they arrived at the address they were given, it was not a hospital or a clinic and the doctor was not a licensed professional.  

Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/cameroon/socio-economic-factors-push-women-girls-cameroon-seek-backstreet-abortio#ixzz1QlDKn3PT

Socio-economic Factors Push Women, Girls in Cameroon to Seek Backstreet Abortions

High risks associated with unsafe abortions in Cameroon don’t deter women and girls here. Economic, social, legal and religious pressures – combined with a lack of information about and access to reproductive health services – often override fear of health risks.

BAMENDA, CAMEROON – Lina, 27, says that when she was 23, her friend told her that she was pregnant. The friend’s boyfriend deserted her when she told him.

Lina, who declined to give her full name for privacy reasons, proposed that they talk to her friend’s mother, but her friend said this wasn’t an option because her mother was Christian and would throw her out of the house for getting pregnant before marriage. Lina says they decided their only option was for her friend to get an abortion out of town where no one would recognize them and no official records would be kept.

She says that they consulted their peers on where they could get a quick and cheap abortion and were referred to a “doctor.” But Lina says that when they arrived at the address they were given, it was not a hospital or a clinic and the doctor was not a licensed professional.  


Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/cameroon/socio-economic-factors-push-women-girls-cameroon-seek-backstreet-abortio#ixzz1QlDKn3PT

Filed under Abortion Africa Women's Rights Health Community

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Entrepreneurial Women in Seaside Villages Reclaim Lives, Rebuild Livelihoods in Chile
More than a year after the earthquake and tsunami in Chile, nongovernmental organizations have made the switch from emergency relief to reconstruction. While government projects are still delayed, women in seaside villages are taking the lead in rebuilding their communities one strand of seaweed at a time.

ENTE DE MAR, CHILE – Elizabeth Ramirez, 38, and her neighbors earn a meager living gathering and harvesting seaweed in Gente de Mar, or “People of the Sea,” an enclave of 30 fishing families in Penco, a city in southern Chile. Families have refused to leave their homes despite the damages from last year’s earthquake and tsunami.

Along the shoreline here, partially repaired houses share the beach with a few wooden dinghies and a carpet of soggy seaweed. Ramirez says that frequent rain has caused the seaweed she recently harvested to rot.

Ramirez and her neighbors sell their seaweed crops to a local agent who ships them to Japan. But after the March earthquake in Japan, demand has withered.

“The police came to tell us that the ola japonesa [Japanese wave] was on its way and to leave our homes,” she says. 

She says the waters washed across the beach and up to her door. But the sea pulled back, and, undeterred, women ventured out to the rocks to hunt for shellfish.

Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/americas/chile/entrepreneurial-women-seaside-villages-reclaim-lives-rebuild-livelihoods-#ixzz1QfzQ1D9p

Entrepreneurial Women in Seaside Villages Reclaim Lives, Rebuild Livelihoods in Chile

More than a year after the earthquake and tsunami in Chile, nongovernmental organizations have made the switch from emergency relief to reconstruction. While government projects are still delayed, women in seaside villages are taking the lead in rebuilding their communities one strand of seaweed at a time.

ENTE DE MAR, CHILE – Elizabeth Ramirez, 38, and her neighbors earn a meager living gathering and harvesting seaweed in Gente de Mar, or “People of the Sea,” an enclave of 30 fishing families in Penco, a city in southern Chile. Families have refused to leave their homes despite the damages from last year’s earthquake and tsunami.

Along the shoreline here, partially repaired houses share the beach with a few wooden dinghies and a carpet of soggy seaweed. Ramirez says that frequent rain has caused the seaweed she recently harvested to rot.

Ramirez and her neighbors sell their seaweed crops to a local agent who ships them to Japan. But after the March earthquake in Japan, demand has withered.

“The police came to tell us that the ola japonesa [Japanese wave] was on its way and to leave our homes,” she says. 

She says the waters washed across the beach and up to her door. But the sea pulled back, and, undeterred, women ventured out to the rocks to hunt for shellfish.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/americas/chile/entrepreneurial-women-seaside-villages-reclaim-lives-rebuild-livelihoods-#ixzz1QfzQ1D9p

Filed under Women Entrepreneurs Tsunami Earthquake Community Poverty Society

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Breast Ironing Affects One in Four Girls in Cameroon
The practice of “breast ironing” – described as brutal by many young girls here – is on the rise in Cameroon. The procedure involves flattening young girl’s growing breasts with hot stones in order to curb the country’s skyrocketing teen pregnancy rate. In rural areas, young girls also report frequent sexual assaults. Still, advocates say breast ironing is an inappropriate solution to both problems: A News Video.Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/cameroon/breast-ironing-affects-one-four-girls-cameroon#ixzz1QUKsnhZD

Breast Ironing Affects One in Four Girls in Cameroon


The practice of “breast ironing” – described as brutal by many young girls here – is on the rise in Cameroon. The procedure involves flattening young girl’s growing breasts with hot stones in order to curb the country’s skyrocketing teen pregnancy rate. In rural areas, young girls also report frequent sexual assaults. Still, advocates say breast ironing is an inappropriate solution to both problems: A News Video.

Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/cameroon/breast-ironing-affects-one-four-girls-cameroon#ixzz1QUKsnhZD

Filed under Gender Justice Breast Cancer Health Community Culture