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Livestock Initiative Restores Land, Water in Zimbabwe

Communities in Zimbabwe report increased suffering thanks to water shortages and land degradation in recent years. Invoking alternative solutions, a local organization is training residents and other nonprofit organizations to use livestock to restore land and natural water sources.
VICTORIA FALLS, ZIMBABWE – Balbinah Nyoni, 37, grew up in Sianyanga village, a rural area that lies in the semiarid region of Matabeleland North province in western Zimbabwe.

Although the province is home to the world-famous Victoria Falls, the people here suffer from long dry spells and high temperatures, thanks to climate change and environmental degradation.

Nyoni is tall and slim. She has eyes that draw everyone’s attention. Her skin is very dark, testifying to her ceaseless expeditions in the scorching sun to provide food and water for her family from the dry land. But her robust walk and rapid talk reflect her fighting spirit as she resists the daily fatigue that seems to sap the energy out of many women, men and children in Sianyanga.

Nyoni stares vacantly at the lifeless, dry lands in front of her and takes a deep breath. She says the land used to be beautiful and that a small perennial river flowed across her village when she was a little girl. Nyoni adds that livestock had plenty of food and water.
Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/zimbabwe/livestock-initiative-restores-land-water-zimbabwe#ixzz1V7BYjCNl

Livestock Initiative Restores Land, Water in Zimbabwe

Communities in Zimbabwe report increased suffering thanks to water shortages and land degradation in recent years. Invoking alternative solutions, a local organization is training residents and other nonprofit organizations to use livestock to restore land and natural water sources.

VICTORIA FALLS, ZIMBABWE – Balbinah Nyoni, 37, grew up in Sianyanga village, a rural area that lies in the semiarid region of Matabeleland North province in western Zimbabwe.

Although the province is home to the world-famous Victoria Falls, the people here suffer from long dry spells and high temperatures, thanks to climate change and environmental degradation.

Nyoni is tall and slim. She has eyes that draw everyone’s attention. Her skin is very dark, testifying to her ceaseless expeditions in the scorching sun to provide food and water for her family from the dry land. But her robust walk and rapid talk reflect her fighting spirit as she resists the daily fatigue that seems to sap the energy out of many women, men and children in Sianyanga.

Nyoni stares vacantly at the lifeless, dry lands in front of her and takes a deep breath. She says the land used to be beautiful and that a small perennial river flowed across her village when she was a little girl. Nyoni adds that livestock had plenty of food and water.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/zimbabwe/livestock-initiative-restores-land-water-zimbabwe#ixzz1V7BYjCNl

Filed under Environment Gender Justice

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Cameroon Takes Strides to Empower Widows, Eliminate Traditional Rituals

Widows in Cameroon say that in addition to dealing with the grief of losing their partners, they must also endure inhumane treatment from in-laws in a series of rituals after the death of a husband. The government and nongovernmental organizations are expanding efforts to address widows’ rights in light of International Widows’ Day, commemorated for the first time this year.
DOUALA, CAMEROON – Margeret Tarla, a mother of four, says her father married her off to his friend before she turned 16. She became the second of the man’s five wives.

Tarla, who lives in Douala, Cameroon’s largest city and the capital of Littoral province, became a widow almost a year ago. She says that after her husband died, she and the other wives were forced to undergo inhumane traditional widowhood rites in the husband’s village.

The wives had to sit on dried plantain leaves for three days and could only eat food served on leaves by a virgin. After three days on the floor, they had to bathe with a concoction of water and other substances, which, according to their husband’s tribe, cleansed them from the bad luck accrued by their intimate relations with their husband. They also had to shave their heads, arms and private parts.

“We go to the stream with a basket,” Tarla says, describing another ritual. “And, after a bath, any widow who does not pass out urine is considered to have a hand in her husband’s death!”

On their way back from the stream, they had to cut down bamboo sticks to symbolize the food they were expected to bring home with them. They were not allowed to look behind them.

“The next day, we move round the market square in line, according to our position in the polygamous marriage,” she says.

Widows here also have to wear a black or white sackcloth for the traditional year of mourning, but Tarla says this is not considered as important as the other rites they went through.

Tarla says the rites were inhumane.

“The rites are so inhumane, such that one would not want her daughter to marry into a tribe with such customs,” she says.
Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/cameroon/cameroon-takes-strides-empower-widows-eliminate-traditional-rituals#ixzz1UhWD7CDx

Cameroon Takes Strides to Empower Widows, Eliminate Traditional Rituals

Widows in Cameroon say that in addition to dealing with the grief of losing their partners, they must also endure inhumane treatment from in-laws in a series of rituals after the death of a husband. The government and nongovernmental organizations are expanding efforts to address widows’ rights in light of International Widows’ Day, commemorated for the first time this year.

DOUALA, CAMEROON – Margeret Tarla, a mother of four, says her father married her off to his friend before she turned 16. She became the second of the man’s five wives.


Tarla, who lives in Douala, Cameroon’s largest city and the capital of Littoral province, became a widow almost a year ago. She says that after her husband died, she and the other wives were forced to undergo inhumane traditional widowhood rites in the husband’s village.


The wives had to sit on dried plantain leaves for three days and could only eat food served on leaves by a virgin. After three days on the floor, they had to bathe with a concoction of water and other substances, which, according to their husband’s tribe, cleansed them from the bad luck accrued by their intimate relations with their husband. They also had to shave their heads, arms and private parts.


“We go to the stream with a basket,” Tarla says, describing another ritual. “And, after a bath, any widow who does not pass out urine is considered to have a hand in her husband’s death!”


On their way back from the stream, they had to cut down bamboo sticks to symbolize the food they were expected to bring home with them. They were not allowed to look behind them.


“The next day, we move round the market square in line, according to our position in the polygamous marriage,” she says.


Widows here also have to wear a black or white sackcloth for the traditional year of mourning, but Tarla says this is not considered as important as the other rites they went through.


Tarla says the rites were inhumane.


“The rites are so inhumane, such that one would not want her daughter to marry into a tribe with such customs,” she says.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/cameroon/cameroon-takes-strides-empower-widows-eliminate-traditional-rituals#ixzz1UhWD7CDx

Filed under Camaroon Gender Justice Culture Tradition Widows Ritual

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Brazil Works to Reduce Unsafe Abortions
Women in Brazil procure more than 1 million unsafe abortions each year, making the procedure one of the top three causes of avoidable death among women in Brazil. Doctors, government health officials and civil society organizations are working to reduce unsafe abortions in Brazil. While some attribute unsafe abortions to socio-economics, others debate abortion law.
 
RECIFE, BRAZIL – Luisa, 20, was 18 when she had an abortion in a clandestine clinic. She says she didn’t want to but felt as if she didn’t have any other choice.
Luisa, who declined to give her full name for privacy reasons, is the eldest of three daughters in a lower-middle-class family in Recife, a port city in northeastern Brazil. Her father worked in a factory and earned a decent wage, which was enough to provide the whole family with everything they needed.
Luisa worked during the day at a clothing store in a shopping mall. She quit her studies a year before to earn some money and become more independent from her parents. When the store hired her, though, she went back to school in the evenings with the support of her employer.
At this store, Luisa met Carlos, whose last name she declined to give for privacy reasons. He was looking for Christmas gifts that day, but came back many times after that to talk to her and eventually invited her on a date.
Carlos was 21 and the only son of a wealthy couple. With time, they fell in love. When they started to have sexual relations, Luisa says she realized she had to protect herself from a possible pregnancy so she began taking birth control pills.
But she soon started having strong headaches, so she went to see a doctor at the town’s family planning clinic. The doctor suggested that she change her contraceptive method to the diaphragm. She learned how to use it properly, and the headaches disappeared.
Three months later, however, she noticed her period was late. Luisa waited for another two weeks, then returned to the clinic. After some testing, they gave her the news: She was pregnant.
Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/americas/brazil/brazil-works-reduce-unsafe-abortions#ixzz1UQ42XvXg

Brazil Works to Reduce Unsafe Abortions

Women in Brazil procure more than 1 million unsafe abortions each year, making the procedure one of the top three causes of avoidable death among women in Brazil. Doctors, government health officials and civil society organizations are working to reduce unsafe abortions in Brazil. While some attribute unsafe abortions to socio-economics, others debate abortion law.


 

RECIFE, BRAZIL – Luisa, 20, was 18 when she had an abortion in a clandestine clinic. She says she didn’t want to but felt as if she didn’t have any other choice.

Luisa, who declined to give her full name for privacy reasons, is the eldest of three daughters in a lower-middle-class family in Recife, a port city in northeastern Brazil. Her father worked in a factory and earned a decent wage, which was enough to provide the whole family with everything they needed.

Luisa worked during the day at a clothing store in a shopping mall. She quit her studies a year before to earn some money and become more independent from her parents. When the store hired her, though, she went back to school in the evenings with the support of her employer.

At this store, Luisa met Carlos, whose last name she declined to give for privacy reasons. He was looking for Christmas gifts that day, but came back many times after that to talk to her and eventually invited her on a date.

Carlos was 21 and the only son of a wealthy couple. With time, they fell in love. When they started to have sexual relations, Luisa says she realized she had to protect herself from a possible pregnancy so she began taking birth control pills.

But she soon started having strong headaches, so she went to see a doctor at the town’s family planning clinic. The doctor suggested that she change her contraceptive method to the diaphragm. She learned how to use it properly, and the headaches disappeared.

Three months later, however, she noticed her period was late. Luisa waited for another two weeks, then returned to the clinic. After some testing, they gave her the news: She was pregnant.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/americas/brazil/brazil-works-reduce-unsafe-abortions#ixzz1UQ42XvXg

Filed under Gender Justice Reproductive Health Law and Society Brazil

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Women in Nepal Warn of Foreign Employment Exploitation
While the Nepali government lifted a decade-long ban on women working abroad in the Gulf only last year, tens of thousands of Nepali women have illegally pursued these foreign jobs in recent years. But without the proper documentation that ensures them government protection, many say they were exploited physically and sexually.
KATHMANDU, NEPAL – Sapana Bishwokarma, 26, has a young face. She looks too young to be the mother of the 2-year-old boy who plays beside her. But she is.

The young mother is answerless when asked about the baby’s father. She says her body trembles with fear each time she recalls her son’s father. Then tears engulf her eyes and trickle down her cheeks.

“I didn’t know that man very well,” says Bishwokarma, who requested her name be changed. “He used to rape me as many times as he wanted, any given time of the day.”

Bishwokarma, of Jhapa, a district in eastern Nepal, says she moved to Saudi Arabia four years ago to work as a nanny. Her eyes moist, she says that an employment agent enticed her with the prospect of a good income.

She says she paid the agent 50,000 rupees, $700 USD, to secure the job for her. Because of a Nepali government ban on working in the Gulf, lifted just last year, she says she traveled first to India then to Saudi Arabia, where two men received her at the airport and took her to the house where she would work.

But instead of working as a nanny as promised, Bishwokarma says she was forced to work as a maid. The situation continued to deteriorate. One month into the job, she says her employer’s unmarried son raped her, with the help of three other men.

Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/women-nepal-warn-foreign-employment-exploitation#ixzz1UAjapasz

Women in Nepal Warn of Foreign Employment Exploitation

While the Nepali government lifted a decade-long ban on women working abroad in the Gulf only last year, tens of thousands of Nepali women have illegally pursued these foreign jobs in recent years. But without the proper documentation that ensures them government protection, many say they were exploited physically and sexually.

KATHMANDU, NEPAL – Sapana Bishwokarma, 26, has a young face. She looks too young to be the mother of the 2-year-old boy who plays beside her. But she is.

The young mother is answerless when asked about the baby’s father. She says her body trembles with fear each time she recalls her son’s father. Then tears engulf her eyes and trickle down her cheeks.

“I didn’t know that man very well,” says Bishwokarma, who requested her name be changed. “He used to rape me as many times as he wanted, any given time of the day.”

Bishwokarma, of Jhapa, a district in eastern Nepal, says she moved to Saudi Arabia four years ago to work as a nanny. Her eyes moist, she says that an employment agent enticed her with the prospect of a good income.

She says she paid the agent 50,000 rupees, $700 USD, to secure the job for her. Because of a Nepali government ban on working in the Gulf, lifted just last year, she says she traveled first to India then to Saudi Arabia, where two men received her at the airport and took her to the house where she would work.

But instead of working as a nanny as promised, Bishwokarma says she was forced to work as a maid. The situation continued to deteriorate. One month into the job, she says her employer’s unmarried son raped her, with the help of three other men.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/women-nepal-warn-foreign-employment-exploitation#ixzz1UAjapasz

Filed under Economy Gender Justice Migrant Labor Labor

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Lone Woman Candidate Eyes Presidency in Cameroon
In preparation for Cameroon’s October presidential elections, the lone woman candidate is campaigning throughout the country and encouraging women to vote. While her campaign has faced numerous obstacles – she was kidnapped in May – she is determined to give voice to women and minorities throughout Cameroon. With an ambitious economic and social agenda, many here believe she is just what the country needs.


BAMENDA, CAMEROON – At every stop Edith Kabbang Walla, 45, popularly known here as Kah Walla, is generating excitement among women nationwide. Walla is the only female candidate running for president in Cameroon’s October elections.

“The interest of women in politics has been aroused, but now we want their active participation,” Walla says during a recent visit to Bamenda, a city in northwestern Cameroon.

Walla entered the national political scene in 2007 and was named by the World Bank in 2008 as one of seven women entrepreneurs in Africa. She declared her candidacy in October 2010, and the Cameroon People’s Party endorsed her in April 2011.

Tracing women’s political participation in Cameroon, Walla says that women were the first group to carry out a public demonstration against colonizers in the fight for Cameroon’s independence. But she says that after gaining independence from France in 1960 and Great Britain in 1961, women’s participation faded into playing traditional roles within political party circles instead of taking on strategic positions, such as president.

“In 1992, a woman ran for presidency, but later joined presidential majority,” she says. “We saw another in 2004, but her candidacy was never accepted. So my candidacy is first to draw national and international attention as [a] woman candidate.”

She believes that her candidacy and her work in the field to get Cameroonians to register to vote have already had an impact on the community and on the way women view politics. If elected president, Walla says she plans to continue to integrage more Cameroonian voices into the decision-making process. Her three priorities are women, the disabled, and the linguistic and ethnic minority.

“These people have been left out of the decision-making processes in the country,” she says.


Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/cameroon/lone-woman-candidate-eyes-presidency-cameroon#ixzz1TnCMi18v

Lone Woman Candidate Eyes Presidency in Cameroon

In preparation for Cameroon’s October presidential elections, the lone woman candidate is campaigning throughout the country and encouraging women to vote. While her campaign has faced numerous obstacles – she was kidnapped in May – she is determined to give voice to women and minorities throughout Cameroon. With an ambitious economic and social agenda, many here believe she is just what the country needs.

BAMENDA, CAMEROON – At every stop Edith Kabbang Walla, 45, popularly known here as Kah Walla, is generating excitement among women nationwide. Walla is the only female candidate running for president in Cameroon’s October elections.


“The interest of women in politics has been aroused, but now we want their active participation,” Walla says during a recent visit to Bamenda, a city in northwestern Cameroon.


Walla entered the national political scene in 2007 and was named by the World Bank in 2008 as one of seven women entrepreneurs in Africa. She declared her candidacy in October 2010, and the Cameroon People’s Party endorsed her in April 2011.


Tracing women’s political participation in Cameroon, Walla says that women were the first group to carry out a public demonstration against colonizers in the fight for Cameroon’s independence. But she says that after gaining independence from France in 1960 and Great Britain in 1961, women’s participation faded into playing traditional roles within political party circles instead of taking on strategic positions, such as president.

“In 1992, a woman ran for presidency, but later joined presidential majority,” she says. “We saw another in 2004, but her candidacy was never accepted. So my candidacy is first to draw national and international attention as [a] woman candidate.”

She believes that her candidacy and her work in the field to get Cameroonians to register to vote have already had an impact on the community and on the way women view politics. If elected president, Walla says she plans to continue to integrage more Cameroonian voices into the decision-making process. Her three priorities are women, the disabled, and the linguistic and ethnic minority.

“These people have been left out of the decision-making processes in the country,” she says.


Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/cameroon/lone-woman-candidate-eyes-presidency-cameroon#ixzz1TnCMi18v

Filed under Cameroon Gender Justice Politics

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Arranged Marriage Before Birth Diminishes Among Nepali Ethnic GroupThe mangni tradition – the arranging of marriages for unborn and young children among family friends – has been prevalent among Nepal’s Tharu ethnic group since the 1940s. But these days the custom is waning as the younger, more educated generation begins to speak out

KANCHANPUR, NEPAL – Even before Phoolmati Chaudhary, whose name has been changed to avoid family conflict, was born, her parents had already arranged her marriage to a friend’s son.

Arranged marriage is a custom of Nepal’s Tharu ethnic group, which Phoolmati’s family belongs to.

Now, 15 years later, the teenager from Nepal’s Far-Western district of Kanchanpur says she became depressed when she found out about her engaged status as she now has a boyfriend whom she dreams of marrying.

“When I confronted my parents [and told them] that I didn’t want a marriage that was fixed before my birth, they didn’t listen,” she says as she draws circles on the barren earth with her bare toes. “They continued to pressure me [into the marriage].” 

The teenager says that the boy her parents arranged her marriage to began to follow her around and pressure her to marry him.

“[I have found out that] he has some bad habits,” she says of his drinking and gambling tendencies. “I don’t want to spend my life with someone like that. But my parents seemed to be worried about their promise to their friends and the society rather than my wishes.”

Phoolmati says that her family also doesn’t know she has a boyfriend whom she loves and wants to marry. 

“Should they come to know about it, I’ll be in trouble,” she says, her tone filled with dread and discomfort.
Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/arranged-marriage-birth-diminishes-among-nepali-ethnic-group#ixzz1SRZbTEZc

Arranged Marriage Before Birth Diminishes Among Nepali Ethnic Group

The mangni tradition – the arranging of marriages for unborn and young children among family friends – has been prevalent among Nepal’s Tharu ethnic group since the 1940s. But these days the custom is waning as the younger, more educated generation begins to speak out

KANCHANPUR, NEPAL – Even before Phoolmati Chaudhary, whose name has been changed to avoid family conflict, was born, her parents had already arranged her marriage to a friend’s son.

Arranged marriage is a custom of Nepal’s Tharu ethnic group, which Phoolmati’s family belongs to.

Now, 15 years later, the teenager from Nepal’s Far-Western district of Kanchanpur says she became depressed when she found out about her engaged status as she now has a boyfriend whom she dreams of marrying.

“When I confronted my parents [and told them] that I didn’t want a marriage that was fixed before my birth, they didn’t listen,” she says as she draws circles on the barren earth with her bare toes. “They continued to pressure me [into the marriage].” 

The teenager says that the boy her parents arranged her marriage to began to follow her around and pressure her to marry him.

“[I have found out that] he has some bad habits,” she says of his drinking and gambling tendencies. “I don’t want to spend my life with someone like that. But my parents seemed to be worried about their promise to their friends and the society rather than my wishes.”

Phoolmati says that her family also doesn’t know she has a boyfriend whom she loves and wants to marry. 

“Should they come to know about it, I’ll be in trouble,” she says, her tone filled with dread and discomfort.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/arranged-marriage-birth-diminishes-among-nepali-ethnic-group#ixzz1SRZbTEZc

Filed under Arranged Marriage Education Gender Justice Nepal Thar Tharu

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Actresses Cite Pay Discrimination in the Nepali Film Industry
Nepali actresses say that despite a constitutional provision that ensures pay equality for men and women, they earn less than actors. Industry insiders confirm this, but disagree on the reasons and remedies.
KATHMANDU, NEPAL – Basundhara Bhusal, 55, says she is the oldest living actress in the Nepali film industry. She has acted in 135 feature films and 60 television series.

But despite her prolific career, she says she hardly earns enough to buy a new sari.

“Five years ago, the famous movie director Prakash Thapa scolded me for wearing the same clothes in many movies,” she says. “But what did he know? I had to wear the same clothes in a bunch of movies because I didn’t have money to buy a new wardrobe for every movie.”

Bhusal says male actors have long been paid more than their female counterparts in the movie industry here.

“The situation was the same decades ago as well,” says Bhusal, who had a role in one of Nepal’s first feature films called “Aama.”

Despite a new provision in Nepal’s constitution that is supposed to ensure men and women are paid equally for the same work, Bhusal and other local actresses say gender discrimination when it comes to salaries in the film industry remains common.

“Even today, female actors are paid almost 50 percent less than male actors,” she says.

Bhusal says she has been advocating for equal pay among actors since long before the constitutional provision came to be.

Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/actresses-cite-pay-discrimination-nepali-film-industry#ixzz1SBfzBB00

Actresses Cite Pay Discrimination in the Nepali Film Industry

Nepali actresses say that despite a constitutional provision that ensures pay equality for men and women, they earn less than actors. Industry insiders confirm this, but disagree on the reasons and remedies.

KATHMANDU, NEPAL – Basundhara Bhusal, 55, says she is the oldest living actress in the Nepali film industry. She has acted in 135 feature films and 60 television series.

But despite her prolific career, she says she hardly earns enough to buy a new sari.

“Five years ago, the famous movie director Prakash Thapa scolded me for wearing the same clothes in many movies,” she says. “But what did he know? I had to wear the same clothes in a bunch of movies because I didn’t have money to buy a new wardrobe for every movie.”

Bhusal says male actors have long been paid more than their female counterparts in the movie industry here.

“The situation was the same decades ago as well,” says Bhusal, who had a role in one of Nepal’s first feature films called “Aama.”

Despite a new provision in Nepal’s constitution that is supposed to ensure men and women are paid equally for the same work, Bhusal and other local actresses say gender discrimination when it comes to salaries in the film industry remains common.

“Even today, female actors are paid almost 50 percent less than male actors,” she says.

Bhusal says she has been advocating for equal pay among actors since long before the constitutional provision came to be.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/nepal/actresses-cite-pay-discrimination-nepali-film-industry#ixzz1SBfzBB00

Filed under Discrimination Gender Justice Arts and Culture Nepal

17 notes

Poll Ranks India Among Most Dangerous Countries for Women, Cites Rising Rates of Female Feticide 
A 2011 poll has named India the fourth most dangerous country in the world for women, thanks in part to rising female feticide and infanticide rates. Despite religious and legal restrictions, even well-educated, wealthy women say they feel social and economic pressures to bear sons and abort daughters.

MUMBAI, INDIA – Jasjit Kaur, 40, who requested her name be changed, is a well-educated urban housewife. Fifteen years ago, she says her family pressured her to have two abortions, a decision she has long regretted.

Kaur says she was a happy mother of two daughters and didn’t want to have more children. But her husband and in-laws kept pressuring her to bear a male child, a preference she didn’t share.

She says that her husband told her that their two daughters would go away to live with their husbands when they got married, but a son would stay and take care of them in their old age. Her husband and her in-laws also worried about the expensive dowries they would have to pay their daughters’ husbands on their wedding days.

Her in-laws also felt they were respected less in their village because they didn’t have a grandson. She says that having a son or grandson was a status symbol for them.

Any attempts to argue about gender equality were in vain. She says daily arguments disrupted the peace of their home, and she didn’t want her daughters to watch their parents fight every day.
Read more: http://globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/india/poll-ranks-india-among-most-dangerous-countries-women-cites-rising-rates-fema#ixzz1RoEkZW00

Poll Ranks India Among Most Dangerous Countries for Women, Cites Rising Rates of Female Feticide
 

A 2011 poll has named India the fourth most dangerous country in the world for women, thanks in part to rising female feticide and infanticide rates. Despite religious and legal restrictions, even well-educated, wealthy women say they feel social and economic pressures to bear sons and abort daughters.

MUMBAI, INDIA – Jasjit Kaur, 40, who requested her name be changed, is a well-educated urban housewife. Fifteen years ago, she says her family pressured her to have two abortions, a decision she has long regretted.


Kaur says she was a happy mother of two daughters and didn’t want to have more children. But her husband and in-laws kept pressuring her to bear a male child, a preference she didn’t share.


She says that her husband told her that their two daughters would go away to live with their husbands when they got married, but a son would stay and take care of them in their old age. Her husband and her in-laws also worried about the expensive dowries they would have to pay their daughters’ husbands on their wedding days.


Her in-laws also felt they were respected less in their village because they didn’t have a grandson. She says that having a son or grandson was a status symbol for them.


Any attempts to argue about gender equality were in vain. She says daily arguments disrupted the peace of their home, and she didn’t want her daughters to watch their parents fight every day.



Read more: http://globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/asia/india/poll-ranks-india-among-most-dangerous-countries-women-cites-rising-rates-fema#ixzz1RoEkZW00

Filed under Feticide Gender Justice India Women Dangerous Places

3 notes

Sex Workers Advocate for Decriminalization of Their Profession
Sex workers in Nigeria are fighting for increased rights and the decriminalization of commercial sex work. Meanwhile, local organizations and the government focus on health, rehabilitation and the arts

LAGOS, NIGERIA – Patricia Okana, who is in her early 30s, is a commercial sex worker.

“It is just like every other thing you do,” she says. “There are challenges, but I thank God it puts food on my table.”

Okana, a widow, says that poverty is the main catalyst driving women into commercial sex work here. After her husband died, she struggled to support herself. Frustrated, she eventually listened to a friend’s advice to try sex work. 

“Everything that tastes bitter must first be sweet, and everything that must be sweet must first be bitter,” she says.

She says that although it pays the bills, she doesn’t encourage young girls to view commercial sex work as their first option.

“I don’t encourage young girls, especially underage,” she says.

Commercial sex workers in Nigeria are demanding more respect and more rights. Nongovernmental organizations, NGOs, have been promoting various rehabilitation and education initiatives. But prohibative costs for these programs lead some advocates to believe that the best option is to decriminalize commercial sex work. The Nigerian Criminal Code penalizes prostitution with imprisonment, but some say the law shouldn’t govern morality. The government has mentioned no plans to decriminalize sex work and instead promotes education and alternative employment.

Nearly 65 percent of Nigerians live below the international poverty line of $1.25 USD a day, according to UNICEF’s latest statistics. Some say this makes sex work an appealing option to earn a living. Official statistics on the number of sex workers in Nigeria are unavailable.
Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/nigeria/sex-workers-advocate-decriminalization-their-profession-nigeria#ixzz1RR5WiLy9

Sex Workers Advocate for Decriminalization of Their Profession

Sex workers in Nigeria are fighting for increased rights and the decriminalization of commercial sex work. Meanwhile, local organizations and the government focus on health, rehabilitation and the arts

LAGOS, NIGERIA – Patricia Okana, who is in her early 30s, is a commercial sex worker.

“It is just like every other thing you do,” she says. “There are challenges, but I thank God it puts food on my table.”

Okana, a widow, says that poverty is the main catalyst driving women into commercial sex work here. After her husband died, she struggled to support herself. Frustrated, she eventually listened to a friend’s advice to try sex work. 

“Everything that tastes bitter must first be sweet, and everything that must be sweet must first be bitter,” she says.

She says that although it pays the bills, she doesn’t encourage young girls to view commercial sex work as their first option.

“I don’t encourage young girls, especially underage,” she says.

Commercial sex workers in Nigeria are demanding more respect and more rights. Nongovernmental organizations, NGOs, have been promoting various rehabilitation and education initiatives. But prohibative costs for these programs lead some advocates to believe that the best option is to decriminalize commercial sex work. The Nigerian Criminal Code penalizes prostitution with imprisonment, but some say the law shouldn’t govern morality. The government has mentioned no plans to decriminalize sex work and instead promotes education and alternative employment.

Nearly 65 percent of Nigerians live below the international poverty line of $1.25 USD a day, according to UNICEF’s latest statistics. Some say this makes sex work an appealing option to earn a living. Official statistics on the number of sex workers in Nigeria are unavailable.



Read more: http://www.globalpressinstitute.org/global-news/africa/nigeria/sex-workers-advocate-decriminalization-their-profession-nigeria#ixzz1RR5WiLy9

Filed under Gender Justice Health Law and Society Poverty Women's Rights Nigeria Sex Worker Rights

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Breast Ironing Affects One in Four Girls in Cameroon


The practice of “breast ironing” – described as brutal by many young girls here – is on the rise in Cameroon. The procedure involves flattening young girl’s growing breasts with hot stones in order to curb the country’s skyrocketing teen pregnancy rate. In rural areas, young girls also report frequent sexual assaults. Still, advocates say breast ironing is an inappropriate solution to both problems: A News Video.

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